57. War on Terror



The War on Terror is a military initiative unleashed by the United States since the September 11 attacks. The President George W. Bush declared the War on Terror as part of an overall strategy to combat terrorism.

Initially neoconservative with strong religious appeal, George Bush even declared a 'Crusade against terror" and against the "Axis of Evil", in what became known as the Bush Doctrine. This has generated strong reaction among European allies, which ended up requiring greater moderation in the use of historical-religious concepts in anti-terror rhetoric. The attack was treated as an act of war, with the government would assume much greater powers than had to chase and detain persons abroad, as well as to promote domestic spying, everything as if it were a war.

The War on Terror meant a mobilization effort at different levels: political-diplomatic, economic, military, intelligence and counter intelligence. As part of the military operations of the War on Terror, the United States invaded and occupied Afghanistan shortly after the terrorist attacks and remained with his troops until the beginning of the withdrawal of the first soldiers of his troop in Afghanistan in 2011.

After the attacks of September 11, 2001 are attributed to al-Qaeda the United States also initiate a search to your leader named Bin Laden that would last almost 10 years and only on May 2, 2011 U.S. authorities reported that bin Laden had been captured and killed in a hideout during an undercover operation conducted by forces in conjunction with the CIA and the Pakistani government, which helped to locate the whereabouts of the terrorist. The DNA of the body, compared to samples of his dead sister, confirmed a degree of kinship. The corpse was kept in military custody.

Since the beginning of the War on Terror, Amnesty International recorded and reported hundreds of cases of serious human rights violations, including torture at Guantanamo Bay and secret CIA prisons.





57. War on Terror





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